Low vitamin D COVID-19 risk found by University of Chicago Medicine

Can vitamin D deficiency increase the likelihood of becoming infected with the coronavirus?

Low vitamin D COVID-19 risk found by University of Chicago Medicine blog image

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Researchers at University of Chicago Medicine have found a link between vitamin D deficiency and he likelihood of becoming infected with the coronavirus in a retrospective study of patients tested for COVID-19.

The research team looked at 489 UChicago Medicine patients whose vitamin D level was measured within a year before being tested for COVID-19. Patients who had vitamin D deficiency (< 20ng/ml) that was not treated were almost twice as likely to test positive for the COVID-19 coronavirus compared to patients who had sufficient levels of the vitamin.

So, what can we do to make sure we’re not vitamin D deficient?

Easy, just make sure you’re eating foods high in vitamin D a few times a week.  Here are 3 of the most popular foods high in vitamin D:


Salmon pink - tinned with bones
Half a tin (around 95 grams) will give you 12.92µg of vitamin D, which is 87% of the average RDA (recommended daily amount)/RI (reference intake)




Cod liver oil
1 Tsp (5 grams) 10.5µg of vitamin D, which is 70% of the average RDA/RI




UV chestnut mushrooms
These have been exposed to UV light so have additional vitamin D. 40 gram of raw UV chestnut mushrooms will give you 12.8µg of vitamin D, which is 86% of the average RDA/RI

You can also search Vitamin D in the search box above to see all foods high in vitamin D.

Keep track of your vitamin D

Keeping a food diary is a great way to track your nutrient intake, not just vitamin D, but all of the vitamins and minerals needed for good health.


NB At checkyourfood.com we use the official RDA for vitamin D provided by the National Academy of Sciences of 15µg per day.

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